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August 22 2013

02:58
1421 aa10 500

#THEGOD’SHONESTTRUTH

Reposted byimpostergruftyadmn

August 20 2013

07:59

David Miranda, schedule 7 and the danger that all reporters now face | Alan Rusbridger | Comment is free | The Guardian

… The mood toughened just over a month ago, when I received a phone call from the centre of government telling me: “You’ve had your fun. Now we want the stuff back.” There followed further meetings with shadowy Whitehall figures. The demand was the same: hand the Snowden material back or destroy it. I explained that we could not research and report on this subject if we complied with this request. The man from Whitehall looked mystified. “You’ve had your debate. There’s no need to write any more.”

During one of these meetings I asked directly whether the government would move to close down the Guardian’s reporting through a legal route – by going to court to force the surrender of the material on which we were working. The official confirmed that, in the absence of handover or destruction, this was indeed the government’s intention. Prior restraint, near impossible in the US, was now explicitly and imminently on the table in the UK. But my experience over WikiLeaks – the thumb drive and the first amendment – had already prepared me for this moment. I explained to the man from Whitehall about the nature of international collaborations and the way in which, these days, media organisations could take advantage of the most permissive legal environments. Bluntly, we did not have to do our reporting from London. Already most of the NSA stories were being reported and edited out of New York. And had it occurred to him that Greenwald lived in Brazil?

The man was unmoved. And so one of the more bizarre moments in the Guardian’s long history occurred – with two GCHQ security experts overseeing the destruction of hard drives in the Guardian’s basement just to make sure there was nothing in the mangled bits of metal which could possibly be of any interest to passing Chinese agents. “We can call off the black helicopters,” joked one as we swept up the remains of a MacBook Pro.

Whitehall was satisfied, but it felt like a peculiarly pointless piece of symbolism that understood nothing about the digital age. We will continue to do patient, painstaking reporting on the Snowden documents, we just won’t do it in London. The seizure of Miranda’s laptop, phones, hard drives and camera will similarly have no effect on Greenwald’s work.

The state that is building such a formidable apparatus of surveillance will do its best to prevent journalists from reporting on it. Most journalists can see that. But I wonder how many have truly understood the absolute threat to journalism implicit in the idea of total surveillance, when or if it comes – and, increasingly, it looks like “when”.

We are not there yet, but it may not be long before it will be impossible for journalists to have confidential sources. Most reporting – indeed, most human life in 2013 – leaves too much of a digital fingerprint. Those colleagues who denigrate Snowden or say reporters should trust the state to know best (many of them in the UK, oddly, on the right) may one day have a cruel awakening. One day it will be their reporting, their cause, under attack. But at least reporters now know to stay away from Heathrow transit lounges.

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20:51
07:52
02:56

Reaction to the detention of David Miranda at Heathrow airport – as it happened | Politics | theguardian.com

• White House: US given ‘heads up’ before Miranda detained
• Miranda accuses Britain of a ‘total abuse of power’
• Watchdog urges Home Office and police to explain detention
• Scotland Yard says detention ‘legally and procedurally sound’

August 19 2013

19:41

Terrorism law watchdog calls for explanation of Miranda detention | World news | theguardian.com

David Anderson QC becomes latest figure to question treatment of Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald’s partner

19:36

August 02 2013

20:32

Suffolk County police say pressure cooker home search due to tipoff | World news | theguardian.com

… Late on Thursday, Suffolk County police said its investigation was in fact prompted by a tipoff, and not covert monitoring. “Suffolk County criminal intelligence detectives received a tip from a Bay Shore based computer company regarding suspicious computer searches conducted by a recently released employee," Suffolk County said in a statement.

"The former employee’s computer searches took place on this employee’s workplace computer. On that computer, the employee searched the terms ‘pressure cooker bombs’ and ‘backpacks’."

The computer company’s police report prompted a visit to Catalano’s home by “six gentleman in casual clothes" who “all had guns in their waistbands", as she described the agents.

"After interviewing the company representatives, Suffolk county police detectives visited the subject’s home to ask about the suspicious internet searches," the statement from police continued. “The incident was investigated by Suffolk County police department’s criminal intelligence detectives and was determined to be non-criminal in nature."

Catalano says she and her husband were “led to believe [the investigation came] solely from searches from within our house". She wrote about the experience on medium.com, prompting outrage at what was taken by somme commenters to be an example of government intrusion into personal privacy.

Late on Thursday night, Catalano issued a clarification, saying here piece – which was republished on the Guardian – had been written in good faith.

"We found out through the Suffolk Police Department that the searches involved also things my husband looked up at his old job. We were not made aware of this at the time of questioning and were led to believe it was solely from searches from within our house. I did not lie or make it up. I wrote the piece with the information that was given. What was withheld from us obviously could not be a part of a story I wrote based on what happened yesterday."

August 01 2013

18:19

New York woman visited by police after researching pressure cookers online | World news | theguardian.com

Long Island resident said her web search history and ‘trying to learn how to cook lentils’ prompted a visit from authorities

… I felt a sense of creeping dread take over. What else had I looked up? What kind of searches did I do that alone seemed innocent enough but put together could make someone suspicious? Were they judging me because my house was a mess (Oh my god, the joint terrorism task force was in my house and there were dirty dishes in my sink!). Mostly I felt a great sense of anxiety. This is where we are at. Where you have no expectation of privacy. Where trying to learn how to cook some lentils could possibly land you on a watch list. Where you have to watch every little thing you do because someone else is watching every little thing you do.

All I know is if I’m going to buy a pressure cooker in the near future, I’m not doing it online.

I’m scared. And not of the right things.

July 29 2013

23:08

Feds tell Web firms to turn over user account passwords | Politics and Law - CNET News

Secret demands mark escalation in Internet surveillance by the federal government through gaining access to user passwords, which are typically stored in encrypted form.

July 11 2013

MerelyGifted
20:29

January 24 2013

04:16

Google stands up for Gmail users, requires cops to get a warrant | Ars Technica

The United States remains far ahead of all governments who request user information from Google according to the company’s latest Transparency Report (July through December 2012) which was released on Wednesday.

American government agencies (including federal, state, and local authorities) made over 8,400 requests for nearly 15,000 accounts—far exceeding India, the next largest country in terms of information requests. In 88 percent of those queries, Google complied with at least some, if not all, of the request.

For the first time, the search giant is also breaking down the type of legal requests that were made.

Google said that 22 percent of those requests were made under probable cause driven search warrants delivered via the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). Authorities have also been known to request information using ECPA suboenas, which are much easier to obtain. It is unclear how many of the subpoenas or warrants that Google complied with—the company has only said it complied in part or in full to 88 percent of total requests from American authorities.

“In order to compel us to produce content in Gmail we require an ECPA search warrant,” said Chris Gaither, Google spokesperson. “If they come for registration information, that’s one thing, but if they ask for content of email that’s another thing.” …

January 23 2013

19:51

Google report reveals continued rise in US government requests for data | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Google has revealed the full scale of the US government’s use of controversial legislation that bypasses judicial approval to access the online information of private citizens.

According to its latest transparency report, the number of requests for private data Google received from US officials had increased by 136% by the end of 2012 from the second half of 2009, when the search firm first started collecting data.

In the US, 68% of requests were made under Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) subpoenas, which, unlike wiretaps or physical search warrants, typically circumvent the need for officials to make their case to a judge. Google said it complies to some degree with 90% of those requests.

This is the first time Google has disclosed the legal processes used by US officials to gather electronic information.

The ECPA has been widely criticised by privacy advocates, and was passed in 1986, long before electronic communication became so common. Under the act, email stored on a third party’s server for more than 180 days is considered abandoned. To access that information, officials need only a written statement certifying that the information is relevant to an investigation.

But Holmes Wilson, co-founder of online advocacy group Fight For the Future, said the Justice Department had argued that emails are “abandoned” once they are opened. “Ironically, the emails that now have the most protection are the spam that you never open,” he said. “ECPA is under dire need of reform. Right now the government can access almost anything that you have online without a warrant and at anytime. Electronic communication should be afforded the same protection as your physical mail or files stores in a cabinet,” he said. …

Reposted bylmn lmn

January 17 2013

09:25

The U.S. government has granted itself authority to secretly snoop on Europeans

ambisyllabicity:

“Europeans, take note: The U.S. government has granted itself authority to secretly snoop on you.

That’s according to a new report produced for the European Parliament, which has warned that a U.S. spy law renewed late last year authorizes “purely political surveillance on foreigners’ data””if it is stored using U.S. cloud services like those provided by Google, Microsoft and Facebook.”

THIS IS IMPORTANT FUCKING SHIT PEOPLE



WTF, Yankistan?!

Reposted fromlmn lmn

March 20 2012

MerelyGifted
20:00
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