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September 19 2012

MerelyGifted
07:35
MerelyGifted
07:28
MerelyGifted
07:20
"Everybody can Dada"
—Dada-Fair, Berlin, poster, 1919

Dada blasted onto the scene in 1916 with ear-splitting enthusiasm: rowdy, brazen, irreverent, and assaulting. Its sounds were clamorous, its visions were shocking, and its language was explosive. Yet Dada was not aimless anarchy. Rather, the artists were responding to the violence and trauma of World War I—and to the shock of modernity more generally—by developing shock tactics of their own. They critiqued traditional conceptions of the artist as master of his medium by using prefabricated materials or relegating aesthetic decisions to chance. They scoffed at the conventional definition of artistic media, expanding it to include the stuff of modern life—newspapers, magazines, ticket stubs, mechanical parts, food wrappers, pipes, advertisements, light bulbs, and so on. Through their performances, publicity stunts, and manipulation of mass media, they further altered perceptions of what constituted a work of art by blurring the boundaries between art and life.  ...



  Via NGA-DADA - Introduction
MerelyGifted
07:18
MerelyGifted
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Subversive and irreverent, Dada, more than any other movement, has shaken society's notions of art and cultural production. Fiercely anti-authoritarian and anti-hierarchical, Dada questioned the myth of originality, of the artist as genius suggesting instead that everybody should be an artist and that almost anything could be art. Surrealism, Constructivism, Lettrism, Situationism, Fluxus, Pop and OpArt, Conceptual Art and Minimalism: most twentieth-century art movements after 1923 have roots to Dada. Dada works still have a radicality and freshness that attracts today's culture jammers and disrupters of life as usual.  ...

   Via DADA Companion
MerelyGifted
07:10
MerelyGifted
07:06

Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection



...  United in their frustration and disillusionment with the war and their disgust with the culture that allowed it, the Dadaists felt that only insurrection and protest could fully express their rage.  "The beginnings of Dada," Tristan Tzara remarked, "were not the beginnings of art, but of disgust."  As Marcel Janco recalled: "We had lost confidence in our culture.  Everything had to be demolished.  We would begin again after the tabula rasa.  At the Cabaret Voltaire we began by shocking the bourgeois, demolishing his idea of art, attacking common sense, public opinion, education, institutions, museums, good taste, in short, the whole prevailing order."   Through uproarious evenings filled with noise-music, abstract-poetry readings, and other performances, Dada began to voice its aggressive message.  While Dada evenings soon became notorious for insurrection and powerful assaults on art and bourgeois culture, it was through Dada journals that the news of this developing movement reached all corners of Europe and even the United States.  ...
MerelyGifted
07:04
MerelyGifted
07:02

Mark Harden's Artchive: "Dada and Surrealism"



...Dada began as an anti-art movement or, at least, a movement against the way art was appreciated by what considered itself the civilized world; Surrealism was much more than an art movement and it thrust home Dada's subversive attack on rational and 'civilized' standards. Whether people are aware of it or not, the Dada and Surrealist revolt has helped to change modern consciousness.

Dada had no formal aesthetic, virtually disregarding easel painting, but the Dadaists shared a nihilistic ethic. The word 'Dada', ambiguously denoting both 'hobby horse' and 'father', was arrived at by chance and gained immediate acceptance by its suitably childish and nonsensical ring. An international movement originating in Zurich and New York at the height of the First World War, it quickly spread to Berlin, Cologne, Hanover, Paris and, to some extent, Russia.

This revolt was against the senseless barbarities of war. It pinpointed the hypocrisy of those who felt that art created spiritual values. Civilization - despite Christianity, despite museums - had indeed broken down when thousands of grown men shelled each other day after day, from muddy trenches. It was no use for the person 'of sensibility', one of Dada's early targets, to take refuge in beauty.

The first step was to make negative gestures; to attack the icons of the old culture. It was in this iconoclastic spirit that in 1917 Marcel Duchamp put a moustache and beard in black crayon on a colored reproduction of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa (c 1502).  ...

MerelyGifted
06:59

Dadaism By Tristan Tzara



...  Dada is a state of mind. That is why it transforms itself according to races and events. Dada applies itself to everything, and yet it is nothing, it is the point where the yes and the no and all the opposites meet, not solemnly in the castles of human philosophies, but very simply at street corners, like dogs and grasshoppers.

Like everything in life, Dada is useless.

Dada is without pretension, as life should be.

Perhaps you will understand me better when I tell you that Dada is a virgin microbe that penetrates with the insistence of air into all the spaces that reason has not been able to fill with words or conventions.

Reposted byYELLOWBREEZES YELLOWBREEZES

August 30 2012

04:25
Her antiquity in preceding and surviving succeeding tellurian generations: her nocturnal predominance: her satellitic dependence: her luminary reflection: her constancy under all her phases, rising and setting by her appointed times, waxing and waning: the forced invariability of her aspect: her indeterminate response to inaffirmative interrogation: her potency over effluent and refluent waters: her power to enamour, to mortify, to invest with beauty, to render insane, to incite to and aid delinquency: the tranquil inscrutability of her visage: the terribility of her isolated dominant resplendent propinquity: her omens of tempest and of calm: the stimulation of her light, her motion and her presence: the admonition of her craters, her arid seas, her silence: her splendour, when visible: her attraction, when invisible.
— James Joyce, Ulysses (via madmalice)

August 03 2012

23:10
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He loved the Kennedys, hated Truman Capote and claimed he slept with 1,000 men and women before he was 25. We celebrate the life of Gore Vidal

(via The A-Z of Gore Vidal | Books | The Guardian)

21:02
8555 fea5

…You have placed your services at the disposal of interests who are turning America into a police state by the simple device of deliberately fostering the conditions that give rise to criminality and then demanding increased police powers and the retention of capital punishment to deal with the situation they have created….

(via Dangerous Minds | William Burroughs’ cold-blooded letter to Truman Capote)

August 02 2012

05:47
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… Vidal’s politics were always on the left side of the spectrum, and he derided the two-party system in his native land, arguing in the 1970s: “There is only one party in the United States, the Property party … and it has two right wings: Republican and Democrat. Republicans are a bit stupider, more rigid, more doctrinaire in their laissez-faire capitalism than the Democrats, who are cuter, prettier, a bit more corrupt – until recently … and more willing than the Republicans to make small adjustments when the poor, the black, the anti-imperialists get out of hand. But, essentially, there is no difference between the two parties.” …

(via Gore Vidal obituary | Books | The Guardian)

05:44
1210 b57f

“The United States was founded by the brightest people in the country — and we haven’t seen them since.”

“Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn.”

(via Gore Vidal quotations: 26 of the best | Books | guardian.co.uk)

05:41
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… His quick wit and acid tongue made him a sought-after commentator; he himself once quipped: “I never miss a chance to have sex or appear on television.” A stint on ABC opposite William Buckley, covering the 1968 Republican and Democratic conventions, degenerated into abuse, with Vidal calling Buckley a “crypto-Nazi”, Buckley suggesting that the “queer … [should] go back to his pornography”, further attacks in the magazine Esquire, and suits for libel on both sides. The same refusal to back down characterised his dispute with Norman Mailer, whose attitudes towards women had brought rebukes from Gloria Steinem and Kate Millett. Vidal entered the fray with an article suggesting there was “a logical progression” from Henry Miller to Mailer to Charles Manson. Mailer responded at a Manhattan dinner party in 1977 by throwing a glass of whiskey in Vidal’s face, head-butting him and then throwing a punch. Vidal is said to have replied: “Lost for words again, Norman?” …

(via Gore Vidal, US writer and contrarian, dies aged 86 | Books | guardian.co.uk)

Reposted byzEveR zEveR

June 16 2012

19:53

fuckyeahjoyce:

litpursuits:

Shocked and slightly appalled that Google didn’t do anything for Bloomsday.

Leave it to the tech geeks to exclude the lit nerds.

They did in 2004.

19:46
7973 fc36

vintageanchor:

“Love loves to love love.”
― James Joyce, Ulysses

Yes I Said Yes I Will Yes: A Celebration of James Joyce, Ulysses, and 100 Years of Bloomsday.

19:43

Extract from Ulysses by James Joyce

...O and the sea the sea crimson sometimes like fire and the glorious sunsets and the figtrees in the Alameda gardens yes and all the queer little streets and the pink and blue and yellow houses and the rosegardens and the jessamine and geraniums and cactuses and Gibraltar as a girl where I was a Flower of the mountain yes when I put the rose in my hair like the Andalusian girls used or shall I wear a red yes and how he kissed me under the Moorish wall and I thought well as well him as another and then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.

19:33
7974 ddee

The cover of the first edition of Ulysses

Nicked from wikipedja

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