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July 03 2014

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December 24 2013

MerelyGifted
00:01
MerelyGifted
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December 23 2013

MerelyGifted
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August 27 2013

MerelyGifted
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August 26 2013

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May 17 2012

MerelyGifted
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April 21 2012

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April 20 2012

23:37
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Statue of Xochipilli, the Aztec “Prince of Flowers,” unearthed in Tlalmanalco on the slopes of the volcano Popocatepetl and now on display in the Museo Nacional in Mexico City.

Labels indicate probable botanical interpretations of stylized glyphs.

(via Hallucinogenic Plants)

Reposted bydrugsloldrugssiriusminervacornisawesomegosqSpinNE555Wekscygenb0ckmynniahairinmyKerisha

March 31 2012

MerelyGifted
22:18
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Name: Amanita muscaria
Location: Gracie's Yard
Date: 1 October 1978

 Via MykoWeb -- Watercolors of Beverly Hackett
Reposted byloldrugsdrugsonlyfaintpaket
MerelyGifted
22:16
MerelyGifted
21:51
3009 ea27 500
Note: Throughout this guide, I will tend to refer to the mushroom in question as the fly agaric, rather than as Amanita muscaria. This is due to the fact that North American fly agarics are coming to be considered a distinct species from the Eurasian Amanita muscaria. Already the western American Amanita muscaria var. flavivolvata has been renamed to Amanita amerimuscaria by Tuloss and Geml.

Proper identification is critical if one is picking this mushroom with the intent to consume it; in addition to our friendly fly agarics, the genus Amanita contains some deadly poisonous mushrooms such as the death cap (A phalloides) and the destroying angel (A bisporigera, A ocreata, A virosa, A verna). Fortunately for us, these deadly poisonous Amanitas are white-capped,and I'm unaware of any red-capped variety of Amanita that contains these lethal hepatotoxic (liver-destroying) amatoxins.

Still, it's always best to be safe and informed when picking mushrooms from the genus Amanita, or indeed any mushroom. For that reason, I'll detail in this article not only the key features by which you can recognize the fly agaric mushroom, but also how to distinguish it from the common look-alikes.  This guide is specific to the North American varieties and their look-alike species; there may be look-alikes on other continents which I do not address here.  ...

  Via Shroomery - Hunting Fly Agarics in North America
Reposted bydrugsloldrugsDarthCannabismeowbaby
MerelyGifted
21:32
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An average dosage is one small to medium cap, going as high as six caps for a very strong dose. This translates to about 6 grams for the low end, with as much as 20 grams in the high end. However, mushrooms have differing potencies, and should be initially tested with a small dose.  ...


Via Alternative Highs: Fly Agaric Mushrooms - Amanita Muscaria
Reposted byloldrugsdrugskilljillWeksDarthCannabismeowbaby
21:32
8069 0b51 500

An average dosage is one small to medium cap, going as high as six caps for a very strong dose. This translates to about 6 grams for the low end, with as much as 20 grams in the high end. However, mushrooms have differing potencies, and should be initially tested with a small dose. …

(via Alternative Highs: Fly Agaric Mushrooms - Amanita Muscaria)

MerelyGifted
21:25
2427 cda1 500
...  Mushrooms are masterpieces of natural engineering. The overnight appearance of the fruit body is a pneumatic process, with the inflation of millions of preformed cells extending the stem, pushing earth aside, and unfolding the cap. Once exposed, the gills of a meadow mushroom shed an astonishing 30,000 spores per second, delivering billions of allergenic particles into the air every day. A minority of spores alights and germinates on fertile ground and some species are capable of spawning the largest and longest-lived organisms on the planet. Mushroom colonies burrow through soil and rotting wood. Some hook into the roots of forest trees and engage in mutually supportive symbioses; others are pathogens that decorate their food sources with hardened hooves and fleshy shelves. Mushrooms work with insects too, fed by and feeding leaf-cutter ants in the New World and termites in the Old World. Among the staggering diversity of mushroom-forming fungi we also find strange apparitions including gigantic puffballs, phallic eruptions with revolting aromas, and tiny “bird’s nests” whose spore-filled eggs are splashed out by raindrops.  ...

 Via OUPblog » Blog Archive » What mushrooms have taught me about the meaning of life
Reposted bydrugspatientck8killjillloldrugsDarthCannabis

March 26 2012

MerelyGifted
07:08

March 25 2012

MerelyGifted
18:52
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