Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

June 21 2017

05:43

December 17 2013

21:01

Winter Solstice

Sun enters Capricorn December 21 5:11 pm GMT 12:11 pm EST 9:11 am PST

December 29 2012

21:41
6990 37d9 500

… When King Arthur started knighting the cyberpunks, I knew I was witnessing the greatest counter-culture medley the world has ever known.

Throughout my time at Stonehenge I had met hippies, Norse gods, ancient kings, bygone warriors, conspiracy theorists, senile Druids, schizophrenics, witches, wizards, demons, hackers, viking families, trance-heads, and even a guy who thought he was a squirrel in human form. Is atheism passé for the left now? Is it time to define a new spirituality for ourselves—one that dances over the line of true belief and metaphor? What if we agreed to harness this prediction and let the proclaimers be right for once? The world may not have ended, but with Obama’s re-election it isn’t hard to see this as a shift in consciousness. And even if that doesn’t really mean anything, we may as well act like it does.

Reposted bywtfpantera wtfpantera

December 21 2012

20:23
9245 fe3f 500

THE RAVEN STEALS THE LIGHT
A Haida Myth
By Bill Reid and Robert Bringhurst

“Before there was anything, before the great flood had covered the earth and receded, before the animals walked the earth or the trees covered the land or the birds flew between the trees, even before the fish and the whales and seals swarm in the sea, an old man lived in a house on the bank of a river with his only child, a daughter. Whether she was as beautiful as hemlock fronds against the spring sky at sunrise or as ugly as a sea slug doesn’t really matter very much to this story, which takes place mainly in the dark.


Because at that time the world was dark. Inky, pitchy, all consuming dark, blacker than a thousand stormy winter midnights, blacker than anything anywhere has been since.

The reason for all this blackness has to do with the old man in the house by the river, who had a box which contained a box which contained a box which contained an infinite number of boxes which nestled in a box slightly larger than itself until finally there was a box so small all it could contain was all the light in the universe.

The Raven, who of course existed at that time, because he had always existed and always would, was somewhat less than satisfied with this state of affairs, since it led to an awful lot of blundering around and bumping into things. It slowed him down a good deal in his pursuit of food and other fleshly pleasures, and in his constant effort to interfere and to change things.

Eventually, his bumbling around in the dark took him close to the home of the old man. He first heard a little singsong voice muttering away. When he followed the voice, he soon came to the wall of the house, and there, placing his ear against the planking, he could just make out the words, “I have a box and inside the box is another box and inside it are many more boxes, and in the smallest box of all is all the light in the world, and it is all mine and I’ll never give any of it to anyone, not even to my daughter, because, who knows, she may be as homely as a sea slug, and neither she nor I would like to know that.”

It took only an instant for the Raven to decide to steal the light for himself, but it took a lot longer for him to invent a way to do so. …

(via A Mountain Hearth: Raven Steals the Light)

20:19
9248 8070 500

Raven Steals the Sun (Artist Proof)
Richard Shorty
Southern Tushony Nation

Serigraph, Artist Proof Edition of 25
2008

(via Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery - Richard Shorty)

20:16
20:13
20:09
20:06
9255 aaf3

Raven Steals the Sun
by ~Xaadaas ©2010-2012
Traditional Art / Paintings / Miscellaneous

A set of three paintings I did in Boulder, Colorado.
The shows the Raven (yaahl) stealing the sun.

(via Raven Steals the Sun by ~Xaadaas on deviantART)

20:03
20:00
19:42
9260 667b 500

A druid recites an incantation during the winter solstice at Stonehenge on Salisbury plain in southern England December 22, 2010. In the northern hemisphere, the winter solstice is the shortest day of the year. REUTERS/Kieran Doherty

19:38
19:35
19:32

Orbiting Frog: The Winter Solstice

orbitingfrog:

In looking for a nice link to send someone explaining the concept of the Solstice, I came across this excellent series of images from the Wikipedia article on the subject. They were created by Wikipedia user Tau’olunga and show a small island at different latitudes on the Earth. The celestial…



This is a brilliant post, and the way tumblr "helpfully" edits others' longish posts really sucks.
19:28
9265 f172 500

Here is a guess at how Stonehenge might have looked about 2400 BC. At dawn on the Summer Solstice, the rays of the Sun would have shone straight through what is called the “slaughter stones” to exactly strike the “altar stone” in the center.

Astronomy has been important to people for thousands of years. The ancient construction known as Stonehenge in England may have been designed, among other purposes, to pay special honor to the solstices and equinoxes. These are the times and locations during Earth’s journey around the Sun that we humans have long used to mark our seasons.

But what is the solstice exactly?

It has to do with some imaginary lines on our planet. These lines are important, because they help people navigate and measure time.

The equator is an imaginary line drawn right around Earth’s middle, like a belt. It divides Earth into the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere.

Another imaginary line drawn straight through Earth connecting the North Pole to the South Pole is Earth’s axis of rotation. This line is tilted 23.5° from Earth’s orbital path around the Sun. This tilt is the cause of Earth’s seasons. …

(via NASA Scijinks :: What’s a solstice?)

19:25
9266 12de 500

The Sun is directly overhead at “high-noon” on Winter Solstice at the latitude called the Tropic of Capricorn.

… Other useful, but imaginary, lines around Earth that are parallel to the Equator are called lines of latitude. They are numbered from 0° to 90°. The one at 0° is the equator itself. The higher the number, the farther north (if it’s a + number) or south (if it’s a − number).

You may have noticed two special lines of latitude on a globe of the world: One in the Northern Hemisphere called the Tropic of Cancer at +23.5° latitude and one in the Southern Hemisphere called the Tropic of Capricorn at − 23.5° latitude.

These are the latitudes where the Sun is directly overhead at noon once a year. In the Northern hemisphere, on the Tropic of Cancer, that is the Summer Solstice, usually June 21. In the Southern Hemisphere, on the Tropic of Capricorn, that is the Winter Solstice, usually December 21. These solstice days are the days with the most (for Summer) or fewest (for Winter) hours of sunlight during the whole year.

The Sun is directly overhead at “high-noon” on the equator twice per year, at the two equinoxes. Spring (or Vernal) Equinox is usually March 20, and Fall (or Autumnal) equinox is usually September 22. Except at the equator, the equinoxes are the only dates with equal daylight and dark. At the equator, all days of the year have the same number of hours of light and dark.

Between the two tropic zones, which includes the equator, the Sun is directly overhead twice per year. Outside the tropic zones, whether to the south or north, the Sun is never directly overhead. …

(via Scijinks :: What’s a solstice?)

19:22
9267 8562 500

Tyrrhenian Sea and Solstice Sky
Credit & Copyright: Danilo Pivato

Explanation: Today the Solstice occurs at 0608 Universal Time, the Sun reaching its southernmost declination in planet Earth’s sky. Of course, the December Solstice marks the beginning of winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the south. When viewed from northern latitudes, the Sun will make its lowest arc through the sky along the southern horizon. So in the north, the Solstice day has the shortest length of time between sunrise and sunset and fewest hours of daylight. This striking composite image follows the Sun’s path through the December Solstice day of 2005 in a beautiful blue sky, looking down the Tyrrhenian Sea coast from Santa Severa toward Fiumicino, Italy. The view covers about 115 degrees in 43 separate, well-planned exposures from sunrise to sunset.

(via APOD: 2007 December 22 - Tyrrhenian Sea and Solstice Sky)

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl