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July 19 2013

07:43
4133 ba37 500

Left: Face From a Composite Statue (Abydos, Tomb of King Den, Dynasty 1, Archaic Period, Reign of King Den, 2373~2859 BCE)

Right: Head of King Khasekhemwy (Dynasty 2, Archaic Period, Reign of King Khasekhemwy, 2676~2649 BCE)

via 2011. 4.16 ~ 4.20 보스턴(Boston) 여행 - 보스턴 미술관(Boston Museum of Fine Arts) : Art of The Ancient World - Egyptian : 네이버 블로그

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian

June 16 2013

04:21
2209 4819

Late Predynastic-Archaic period Egyptian pottery lion who now lives at Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum

via wikimedja commons

Reposted bycatsFreXxXgreenfoxepheeschaaf

June 15 2013

21:25
7089 54f2 500

The main temple of Koptos was already heavily destroyed by the time Petrie started his excavations. Petrie could only record some important features of the Ptolemaic-Roman temple, which show that the building was at least at this time a double temple, dedicated to Min and Isis, who was at Koptos the wife of Min. From the temple of the New Kingdom Petrie could only trace the outlines, while from the earlier temples only single blocks and elements were found. However, there is a series of reliefs belonging to king Nubkheperre Intef (17th Dynasty), and there are important objects (colossi statues, figures of lions) of the pre-and early dynastic period, showing the importance of the temple at that time. Reconstructions on Digital Egypt focus on these periods. All these reconstructions are highly hypothetical, but based on contemporary parallels from other sites in Egypt.

  Via University College London - Digital Egypt - Koptos

21:15
7091 4c69 500

The main temple of Koptos was already heavily destroyed by the time Petrie started his excavations. Petrie could only record some important features of the Ptolemaic-Roman temple, which show that the building was at least at this time a double temple, dedicated to Min and Isis, who was at Koptos the wife of Min. From the temple of the New Kingdom Petrie could only trace the outlines, while from the earlier temples only single blocks and elements were found. However, there is a series of reliefs belonging to king Nubkheperre Intef (17th Dynasty), and there are important objects (colossi statues, figures of lions) of the pre-and early dynastic period, showing the importance of the temple at that time. Reconstructions on Digital Egypt focus on these periods. All these reconstructions are highly hypothetical, but based on contemporary parallels from other sites in Egypt.

  Via University College London - Digital Egypt - Koptos

21:05
7095 c7e2 500

The main temple of Koptos was already heavily destroyed by the time Petrie started his excavations. Petrie could only record some important features of the Ptolemaic-Roman temple, which show that the building was at least at this time a double temple, dedicated to Min and Isis, who was at Koptos the wife of Min. From the temple of the New Kingdom Petrie could only trace the outlines, while from the earlier temples only single blocks and elements were found. However, there is a series of reliefs belonging to king Nubkheperre Intef (17th Dynasty), and there are important objects (colossi statues, figures of lions) of the pre-and early dynastic period, showing the importance of the temple at that time. Reconstructions on Digital Egypt focus on these periods. All these reconstructions are highly hypothetical, but based on contemporary parallels from other sites in Egypt.

  Via University College London - Digital Egypt - Koptos

April 08 2013

07:46
4733 fb5c 500

Tomb of Queen Merneith, Abydos; Archaic Period, First Dynasty - ca. 3000 BCE

06:52
4734 f717 500

Tomb of Queen Merneith, Abydos; Archaic Period, First Dynasty - ca. 3000 BCE

06:32
06:22
4736 13cf

Stele of Queen Merneith, possibly the 5th ruler of the First Dynasty, ruling from sometime around 3000 BCE. There are no accounts regarding the length of her reign.
She was most likely the wife of King Djer, as well as the mother of Den. One quite possible theory states that she ruled Egypt while Den was still a child. Inscriptions from Abydos and Saqqara support this theory, where she is titled “King’s Mother.”

December 24 2012

02:45
0945 7c1d 500

Those conglomerate rocks are mighty hard to carve, too, also!

(via Corpus of Egyptian Early Dynastic Inscriptions on Stone Vessels)

Reposted bysiriusminervarepostedfromeverybodyliess
01:55
0784 f76d 500

Ashmolean Mus. E 3924
Hierakonpolis - h. 42,5 cm (x 22) (schist)

(via The Hierakonpolis Palette or Two Dogs, Oxford, Ashmolean Palette)

Reposted bysiriusminerva siriusminerva
01:44
0785 8e3b

This is a fragment of an Early Dynastic stone vessel in the private Smith collection (USA) inscribed with the name of the goddess Bastet (Wbastit). The object is made of two sherds joined together; the inscription is incised, with no sign of pigments in the lines; the goddess name is complete but it cannot be said if the inscription is too. The fragment max size is 2.5 x 1.75 inches (6,35 x 4,45cm) and it seems that it was originally a small roughly conical vessel of a grey stone; its lip is carefully rounded.

THE INSCRIPTION
The name of the lion (later cat-) goddess Bastet is rather common in the Second Dynasty (cf. image below, especially from Hotepsekhemwy and Ninetjer reigns): the w is always graphically elided because initial atone vowel which usually doesn’t appear in the writing (except in the Greek rendering i.e. the name of king Petubastit = Petubastis; Lacau, in: PD V, 35). The s precedes the Ba bird owing to a common graphical metathesis recurring in most of the variants of this name. The horizontal ointment vessel bas is very stylized, unusually long and without inner lines but only the indication of the lid. The two t of the radical and feminine ending are often elided in the archaic writing, but they are retained in the present one. The determinative of the sitting goddess is attested in Early Dynastic inscriptions as the name also is. The goddess has a feline head and she holds the was scepter (common attribute of gods in this period inscriptions as with Seth/Ash, Neith, Bastet). She seats on a throne known also in the relief and sculpture of the Second-Third Dynasty (it has the form of the Hwt hieroglyph and a low back) even if not as common as the true throne with pedestal (as that of the Cairo Museum statue of Netjerykhet/Djoser and the one in the inscription on a vessel from Menkaura’s complex, cf. image below), or as the Khendw throne (with lateral bent arcs) or the seats with lion/bull feet. Except for the Giza bowl inscription, the determinative is generally that of the standing goddess. [For parallels of the goddess and its hieroglyphic name during the Thinite period (early Second Dynasty) see HERE (Hotepsekhemwy and Njnetjer). Cf. Wilkinson, Early Dynastic Egypt, 1999, 282; Lacau-Lauer, PD IV, nr. 57-58, 63-67 (Djefaw-Bastt); PD V, p. 35, fig. 55; Reisner, Mycerinus, 1931, p. 102, pl. 70; name: WB I, 423, 4-8; seat: Kaplony, IAF I, 237-238; Bas vase: ibid., 274; id., IAF II, n. 1527, 105, 992 (grgt Bastt), 1603; Helck, Thinitenzeit, 1987, 71-72; Kahl, Das System, 1994, 790ff. (bas jar); for mainly later evidence concerning Bastet cf. E. Otto, in: LÄ I, 628-630]. …

(via An Unpublished Early Dynastic inscription of the Goddess Bastet (Wbastit))

01:12

Egyptology Articles by Francesco Raffaele and other scholars

PDFs - most in French, one in Italian, four in English

December 21 2012

22:12

Egyptomaniacs, please help!

I have scoured the internet for ages, unsuccessfully trying to find out how the name of the city of Tjenu (AKA This, Thinis) was hieroglyphically written. I found the city standard for Abydos, but info about Tjenu is mighty thin on the ground/intert00bs.

September 04 2012

06:22
1263 414f 500

1st Dynasty (?) ivory statuette of a king - from Abydos

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian
06:02

June 10 2012

02:04
8734 0413 500

Tiefe Schale

Dm. 18 cm. Rote Kalkbrekzie.
Ägypten, Frühzeit, 1.-3. Dynastie, 3000 - 2700 v.C.

Die bauchige Schale zeichnet sich durch ihre ausladend konvex gewölbte Wandung, die nach innen gekrümmte Lippe und den flachen, abgesetzten Fuss aus. Oberfläche geglättet. Restauriert.

Provenienz: Slg. Dr. Kreuzer, München. Kunstmarkt London, 1970er-1980er Jahre.

Vgl. Aston - 1994, 111 Nr. 49-50.



Ausgezeichnet!


 (via Auktion 6 - Seite 1)

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian
02:01
8735 5dae 500

A Deep Bowl

D. 18 cm. Red breccia.
Egypt, Early Dynastic Period, 1st-3rd Dynasty, 3000 - 2700 B.C.

Wide bowl with a sweeping, convex wall. The lip curves inwards. Flat, offset foot. Surface smoothly worked. Restorations.

Provenance: Coll. Dr. Kreuzer, London mkt., 1970’s / 1980’s.

Cf. Aston - 1994, 111 nos. 49/50.

  (via Auction 6 - Page 1)

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian

April 23 2012

06:32
9956 7135

Item Description

* Title: Bracelets from Abydos, Tomb of Djer
* Photographer: Émile Brugsch
* Time Period: Early Dynastic Period - Dynasty I
* Caption: No caption.
* Item Information: File name - egypt227; Catalog number - A1: 521 1st dyn. 7
* Type of Print: Sepia toned platinum
* Original Size: 3-1/4 x 9-3/8
* Location: Cairo Museum

(via Early Images of Egypt | Bracelets from Abydos, Tomb of Djer)

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian

March 26 2011

00:04

Late Predynastic and Early Dynastic Egypt by Francesco Raffaele

Stela of Queen Merneith

Ivory comb with the serekh of King Djet

King Djet's stela

L'il ivory lion

All 1st Dynasty
Reposted byAncientEgyptiansiriusminerva
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