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November 25 2012

08:23
2921 baf8 500

dwellerinthelibrary:

Sakhmet and Nefertem, Shrine of Amenophis I.

(Is that Sekhmet? It would make sense, given she’s Neferterm’s mum, but if so, that’s an odd writing of her name…)

The (very) occasional writer calls her “Sakhmet.”

September 08 2012

03:38
8124 c7b0 500

Scarab of Amenhotep I

1514–1493 B.C.E.

Height x width x length: 1.6 x 2.4 x 3 cm (5/8 x 15/16 x 1 3/16 in.)
Glazed steatite
Type, sub-type: Egyptian
New Kingdom Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep I
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Steatite scarab, green-glazed with brown discolorations; beetle entirely undercut and raised above the base plate; hole between feet fore and aft; base plate decorated with sunk relief and inscription, including name of Amenhotep I.

Via MFA Educators: Egyptian Artwork Slideshow

Reposted byfitoAncientEgyptian
03:37
8125 109f 500

Limestone statue of Amenhotep I - British Museum

From Deir el-Bahari, Thebes, Egypt
18th Dynasty, about 1510 BCE

The classic pose of Osiris

After the construction of the mortuary complex of Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II (2055-2004 BCE) in the Eleventh Dynasty (about 2125-1985 BCE), the area of Deir el-Bahari became a holy place. This statue comes from a temple set up there by Amenhotep I (1525-1504 BCE). It shows Amenhotep as Osiris. The temple itself was probably dedicated to the particular form of the goddess Hathor who was revered at Deir el-Bahari.

Relatively little is known about Amenhotep’s temple, since it was dismantled when Hatshepsut (1479-1457 BCE) started work on her own mortuary complex at Deir el-Bahari. A number of statues such as this were probably placed at the entrance to Amenhotep’s temple, and when the temple was dismantled they were apparently moved to the site of the Mentuhotep temple, where they kept company with the statues of Senwosret III (1874-1855 BCE), placed there at a much earlier date.

The history of this statue is evidence of the respect sometimes shown by one king to a predecessor when it was necessary to move a structure.

(by sasseymills)

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian
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