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07:13
3101 b64c 500

The procession of Amun-Re’s divine bark [barque]. Relief from the Red Chapel of Hatshepsut.

… Sacred Barks and Divine Rest Stations

Central to these festivals were magnificent processions in which priests transported the golden, bejeweled cult statues of the gods within a type of portable shrine. Taking the form of miniature boats called sacred barks, these model vessels were covered in gold foil and encrusted with precious gemstone inlays of lapis lazuli, turquoise, and carnelian. Each deity had his or her own sacred bark which priests transported over land on platforms with several long carrying poles. Two impressive figureheads at the prow and stern of each bark identified its owner. Amun’s bark had ram’s head figureheads since that animal was sacred to him, that of Mut had a woman’s head fore and aft, each wearing the Double Crown, and Khonsu’s had falcon’s heads with lunar crescents and disks. …

via Hypostyle Project :: Meaning and Function :: University of Memphis

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian

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