Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

May 26 2020

MerelyGifted
19:08

Places in Midsomer County - Midsomer Murders

Reposted byskillzmcfly skillzmcfly
MerelyGifted
19:07
You and I are the two most important artists of the age - you in the Egyptian style, and I in the modern one.
— Henri Rousseau to Pablo Picasso
Sponsored post
feedback2020-admin
04:05
MerelyGifted
19:03

New Zealand earthquake: PM Jacinda Ardern live on TV in Wellington as North Island hit | World news | The Guardian

New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has developed a reputation for keeping her cool in the face of a crisis. But an earthquake first thing on Monday morning as she was interviewed live on television seemed like an unusually trying way to start a week.

“We’re just having a bit of an earthquake here,” Ardern told Ryan Bridge, a host for Newshub’s AM Show, live on air. Casting her eyes to the ceiling of the room she was standing in at New Zealand’s parliament in Wellington, she remained in place as the television camera jolted.

The 5.9 magnitude earthquake hit 30 km north-west of Levin, a town about an hour’s drive north from the capital, at a depth of 37 km, according to the country’s seismology agency. No injuries or structural damage have been reported.

“Quite a decent shake here, but if you see things moving behind me, the Beehive moves more than most,” Ardern said, referring to the name given to the main parliament building, as the room rattled around her.

The quake lasted about 15 seconds and was felt by tens of thousands of New Zealanders as far afield as Auckland in the north and Dunedin on the South Island.

“We’re fine,” Ardern told Bridge, signalling she was ready to continue the interview as the quake rolled to a close. “I’m not under any hanging lights.”

Ardern later told reporters that the first thought to mind as the room began to shake was, “Are you serious?” 

Reposted byskillzmcfly skillzmcfly
MerelyGifted
18:58

Regrets? St Dom had a few, but then again too few to mention | John Crace | Politics | The Guardian

Dominic Cummings used his press conference to flick a V and remind us rules apply differently to him
By John Crace

 There was to be no redemption for Laughing Boy. His presser may have satisfied a few of the Boris faithful, but the majority of the country could only see a man who had chosen to break the rules and had – worse still – put the nation’s health at risk by effectively telling everyone they could interpret the rules however they wanted. Not that Dom would have cared that much. What would have hurt the most was that he had been seen for who he really was. A man who can turn any hint of regret into a giant “fuck you”.

MerelyGifted
18:58
MerelyGifted
18:57
MerelyGifted
07:23

Oh, you Darling! XD Many thanks!

Stay safe and well, my friend.

MerelyGifted
07:19

May 25 2020

MerelyGifted
13:12
MerelyGifted
13:09
7614 4acb

Eugène Atget – Vénus, Musée de Cluny; Haut-relief provenant du Château d’Anet

via Cluny Museum, 24 rue du Sommerard, 5th arrondissement, Paris. Venus. | Paris Museums

May 24 2020

MerelyGifted
16:39
6485 5521
Reposted fromHereName HereName vianaich naich
MerelyGifted
16:32
9752 3415
Reposted fromteijakool teijakool
MerelyGifted
16:32
Reposted fromjezu jezu
MerelyGifted
16:19
Reposted fromjezu jezu
MerelyGifted
16:19
MerelyGifted
16:19
MerelyGifted
16:18
MerelyGifted
12:43
MerelyGifted
11:24

World Wide Words: Needs must when the devil drives

Is it British or American, and when did it originate?

…Shakespeare uses it in All’s Well that Ends Well: “My poor body, madam, requires it: I am driven on by the flesh; and he must needs go that the devil drives”. However, it is actually older — the earliest I can find is in John Lydgate’s Assembly of Gods, written about 1420: “He must nedys go that the deuell dryves”.

The form…quote[d] is the usual modern one, but it isn’t so easy to understand, as it is abbreviated and includes needs must, which is a semi-archaic fixed phrase — now effectively an idiom — meaning “necessity compels”. The Shakespearean wording makes the meaning clearer: if the devil drives you, you have no choice but to go, or in other words, sometimes events compel you to do something you would much rather not.

 

I prefer the even more elegant euphemism used by RS Surtees in the 1840s: “Needs must when a certain old gentleman drives.”

MerelyGifted
11:23
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.
(PRO)
No Soup for you

Don't be the product, buy the product!

close
YES, I want to SOUP ●UP for ...