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August 23 2013

MerelyGifted
22:10
6399 fedd 500
Well it was brought to my attention by two well informed friends today that hidden away amongst the gargoyles on Paisley Abbey there is an Alien!, so I did a bit of recon, dropped by and went looking for it and sure enough it's there!.. Pretty strange seeing it on an ancient historic Abbey (William Wallace was educated there fact fans) its alleged a German stonemason did it in the 80s during a restoration and it went undiscovered for a few years and they decided to keep it.
Reposted fromirukandjisyndrome irukandjisyndrome viaGantar Gantar

July 06 2013

00:32
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Ta, MadnessReigns!

Reposted bymolotovcupcakeschaafKrebs

April 07 2013

21:35
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slobbering:

We shall see that at which dogs howl in the dark, and that at which cats prick up their ears after midnight.

- H. P. Lovecraft 

Reposted bysiriusminervalovecraftelcommendanterazielinikajajajaSakerosSpinNE555Krebskerio

March 16 2013

MerelyGifted
19:55

January 20 2013

07:39

November 07 2012

20:41
20:29
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In 1962, as he gave his Guest of Honor speech at the World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, science fiction author Theodore Sturgeon delivered the following anecdote about writer’s block and fellow novelist, Robert Heinlein:

“I went into a horrible dry spell one time. It was a desperate dry spell and an awful lot depended on me getting writing again. Finally, I wrote to Bob Heinlein. I told him my troubles; that I couldn’t write—perhaps it was that I had no ideas in my head that would strike a story. By return airmail—I don’t know how he did it—I got back 26 story ideas. Some of them ran for a page and a half; one or two of them were a line or two. I mean, there were story ideas that some writers would give their left ear for. Some of them were merely suggestions; just little hints, things that will spark a writer like, ‘Ghost of a little cat patting around eternity looking for a familiar lap to sit in.’

This mechanical, chrome-plated Heinlein has a great deal of heart. I had told him my writing troubles, but I hadn’t told him of any other troubles; however, clipped to the stack of story ideas was a check for a hundred dollars with a little scribbled note, ‘I have a suspicion your credit is bent.’

It is very difficult for words like ‘thank you’ to handle a man that can do a thing like that.”

The incredibly generous letter in question — sent by Heinlein just two days after being asked for help and directly responsible for two of Sturgeon’s subsequent stories (“And Now the News” and “The Other Man”) — can be read, in full, below. …

(via Letters of Note: The Heinlein Maneuver)

Reposted bysofastsiriusminervazEveRfafnirscavegehirnfaschingfrittatensuppeLeMightyMustache

August 15 2012

18:35
18:06
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Jim Burns’ cover painting for Harry Harrison’s A Stainless Steel Rat is Born

18:02
18:00
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JIM BURNS (English b. 1948)
The Stainless Steel Rat Wants You, paperback cover, 1987
Oil on board
25 x 15.5 in.
Initialed lower left
This illustration was used on the cover of Harry Harrison’s novel, The Stainless Steel Rat Wants You!, Spectra/Bantam Books, 1988.

“Slippery Jim diGriz, the future’s master criminal turned super-spy, is recruiting for an all-out interstellar war. Loathsome, mind sucking creatures from an unknown star are closing in on Earth. Once again it’s up to the Stainless Steel Rat to save humanity. In a daring caper packed with action and laughs, the Rat goes undercover to stop the invasion-disguised as a hideous, bug-eyed extraterrestrial.”

(via JIM BURNS (English b. 1948) The Stainless Steel Rat Wants You!: Lot 87101)

17:31
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Cover of The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted, artwork by Jim Burns

If Harry Harrison had only created “Slippery” Jim DiGriz, the roguish hero of the Stainless Steel Rat books, he would deserve a high place in science fiction history. But he also wrote dozens of other novels, including the hilarious Bill the Galactic Hero saga, the proto-Steampunk classic A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah!, and the novel that became the movie Soylent Green, Make Room! Make Room!.

Amazingly, Harrison kept writing great novels, with the last Stainless Steel Rat book coming out just two years ago. He died today, aged 87, according to his official website. No details are yet known.

There are few really great comic space opera novels, aside from Douglas Adams. And Harrison’s Stainless Steel Rat books qualify — Jim DiGriz is a really inspired creation, a rogue smuggler created years before Han Solo existed. Even as “Slippery” Jim sort of goes straight in the later books, he never stops being a source of ridiculous fun, and his romance with the equally criminal and devious Angelina is a really sweet, heartfelt relationship. I read the Stainless Steel Rat books at a very impressionable age, and a lot of clever bits stick in my mind — like the bit where “Slippery” Jim explains that intergalactic empires are impossible due to the problems with travel at relativistic speeds. This series was always smarter than a lot of other space operas, even alongside its gratifying levels of silliness. …

(via R.I.P. Harry Harrison, creator of the Stainless Steel Rat, Bill the Galactic Hero, and Soylent Green)

17:23

Harry Harrison obituary | Books | The Guardian

Harry Harrison, who has died aged 87, was a writer from the world of American comics and science-fiction magazines of the 1950s. An amazingly prolific author, who gradually took on more serious themes as he matured, Harrison is probably best known for the book that inspired the Hollywood film Soylent Green (1973). Directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Charlton Heston and Edward G Robinson, Soylent Green was an uncompromising view of a world a quarter of a century into the future, in which massive overpopulation has created a critical food shortage. The solution is an alleged soya/lentil substitute – the plot concerns the discovery of the true nature of the stuff.

The original novel was called Make Room! Make Room! (1966). Harrison said wryly that the film “at times bore a faint resemblance to the book”. It was a serious, thoroughly researched novel, written at a time when there was little discussion of the population time-bomb. Although overpopulation was a common theme in far-future science fiction, Harrison’s idea was to depict a near-future society (year 2000) that many of us, or our children, would live to see. It marked a change of direction for Harrison, although it was an early sign of a trend in his work that was not to emerge in full until some years later.

His most popular and best-known work is contained in fast-moving parodies, homages or even straight reconstructions of traditional space-opera adventures. He wrote several named series of these: notably the Deathworld series (three titles, starting in 1960), the Stainless Steel Rat books (12 titles, from 1961), and the sequence of books about Bill, the Galactic Hero (seven titles, from 1965). These books all present interesting contradictions. While being exactly what they might superficially seem to be, unpretentious action novels with a strong streak of humour, they are also satirical, knowing, subversive, unapologetically anti-military, anti-authority and anti-violence. Harrison wrote such novels in the idiom of the politically conservative hack writer, but in reality he had a liberal conscience and a sharp awareness of the lack of literary values in so much of the SF he was parodying. …

July 29 2012

07:43
Martinet! Space idiot!
— War of the Planets (1966), one of the worst sci-fi b-movies evAr

April 23 2012

03:36
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spocko:

A future in which human beings, known as “Oms” (a homonym of the French-language word hommes, meaning men), are creatures on the Draags’ home planet, where they are seen as pests and sometimes kept as pets (with collars). The Draags are an alien species which is humanoid in shape but a hundred times larger than humans, with blue skin, fan-like earlobes and huge, protruding red eyes. The Draags also live much longer than human beings – one Draag week equals a human year. Some Oms are domesticated as pets, but others run wild, and are periodically exterminated.

Fantastic Planet rocketh.

Reposted bygifluvsiriusminervafitokilljillgreensky
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