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April 27 2018

MerelyGifted
08:44
3100 848d

Explanation: You couldn't really be caught in this blizzard while standing by a cliff on Churyumov-Gerasimenko, also known as comet 67P. Orbiting the comet in June of 2016 the Rosetta spacecraft's narrow angle camera did record streaks of dust and ice particles though, as they drifted across the field of view near the camera and above the comet's surface. Still, some of the bright specks in the scene are likely due to a rain of energetic charged particles or cosmic rays hitting the camera, and the dense background of stars in the direction of the constellation Canis Major. Click on this single frame to play and the background stars are easy to spot as they trail from top to bottom in an animated gif (7.7MB). The 33 frames of the time compressed animation span about 25 minutes of real time. The stunning gif was constructed from consecutive images taken while Rosetta cruised some 13 kilometers from the comet's nucleus.

Astronomy Picture of the Day - 2018 April 26

Reposted byGabreiilaschaafravenpikolokolo

December 08 2012

23:47
0585 6ceb

infinity-imagined:

Landing the Curiosity Rover on Mars.

   The Curiosity Rover will land on Mars at 10:31 PDT.

Reposted fromfoxbanana foxbanana
23:45
3877 8599 500

asgardian-hearts:

thedavynator:

thegirlthatgavetheangelitswings:

crowleysconsultinggodofmischief:

frenchgirard:

lights-camera-and-rowling:

rawsexting:

Top photo from “Mars” Curiosity.  We, of course, have seen that photo 30 years ago in Star Wars.

I just screeched. 

GOD.

In a galaxy far far away my ass.

If there’s a bright center of the Universe, we’re at the point that’s farthest from.

THE NOISE I MADE WAS NOT OF THIS REALM

Reposted fromfoxbanana foxbanana

November 12 2012

00:58

November 09 2012

07:00

September 14 2012

MerelyGifted
16:36

August 09 2012

MerelyGifted
19:13

Curiosity’s Descent

This stop-motion video shows 297 frames from the Mars Descent Imager aboard NASA’s Curiosity rover as it descended to the surface of Mars. These thumbnail images were received on Earth on Aug. 6, 2012, and cover the last two and a half minutes of descent.

(via NASA - Multimedia - Video Gallery)

August 07 2012

06:12
06:02
2156 ffe5 500

Original Caption Released with Image:

NASA’s Curiosity rover and its parachute were spotted by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as Curiosity descended to the surface on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6 EDT). The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera captured this image of Curiosity while the orbiter was listening to transmissions from the rover. Curiosity and its parachute are in the center of the white box; the inset image is a cutout of the rover stretched to avoid saturation. The rover is descending toward the etched plains just north of the sand dunes that fringe “Mt. Sharp.” From the perspective of the orbiter, the parachute and Curiosity are flying at an angle relative to the surface, so the landing site does not appear directly below the rover.

The parachute appears fully inflated and performing perfectly. Details in the parachute, such as the band gap at the edges and the central hole, are clearly seen. The cords connecting the parachute to the back shell cannot be seen, although they were seen in the image of NASA’s Phoenix lander descending, perhaps due to the difference in lighting angles. The bright spot on the back shell containing Curiosity might be a specular reflection off of a shiny area. Curiosity was released from the back shell sometime after this image was acquired. …

(via Catalog Page for PIA15978)

July 25 2012

06:32
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