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June 07 2014

22:42

August 09 2013

09:30
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Inscribed ivory labels, from Tomb U-j at Abydos - c. 3200 BCE

Some of the earliest known writing.

via Abydos – Umm el-Qaab | Deutsches Archäologisches Institut

09:25
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Ivory figurine of a lady, Naqada IId - the late Naqada II period began c. 3400 BCE

Abydos, Cemetery U

via Abydos – Umm el-Qaab | Deutsches Archäologisches Institut

June 19 2013

00:04
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Prehistoric hand stencil rock art from Gilf Kebir, in the desert of southwest Egypt

via Colloquium Notes: The Signs of Which Times? | The Archaeology of Egypt’s Deserts

Reposted bypsyentistAncientEgyptian

June 16 2013

00:08
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King Scorpion, detail of his ceremonial macehead found in Hierakonpolis/Nekhen - it now lives at Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum

via wikimedja commons

Reposted byun9zorax

June 15 2013

21:25
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The main temple of Koptos was already heavily destroyed by the time Petrie started his excavations. Petrie could only record some important features of the Ptolemaic-Roman temple, which show that the building was at least at this time a double temple, dedicated to Min and Isis, who was at Koptos the wife of Min. From the temple of the New Kingdom Petrie could only trace the outlines, while from the earlier temples only single blocks and elements were found. However, there is a series of reliefs belonging to king Nubkheperre Intef (17th Dynasty), and there are important objects (colossi statues, figures of lions) of the pre-and early dynastic period, showing the importance of the temple at that time. Reconstructions on Digital Egypt focus on these periods. All these reconstructions are highly hypothetical, but based on contemporary parallels from other sites in Egypt.

  Via University College London - Digital Egypt - Koptos

21:15
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The main temple of Koptos was already heavily destroyed by the time Petrie started his excavations. Petrie could only record some important features of the Ptolemaic-Roman temple, which show that the building was at least at this time a double temple, dedicated to Min and Isis, who was at Koptos the wife of Min. From the temple of the New Kingdom Petrie could only trace the outlines, while from the earlier temples only single blocks and elements were found. However, there is a series of reliefs belonging to king Nubkheperre Intef (17th Dynasty), and there are important objects (colossi statues, figures of lions) of the pre-and early dynastic period, showing the importance of the temple at that time. Reconstructions on Digital Egypt focus on these periods. All these reconstructions are highly hypothetical, but based on contemporary parallels from other sites in Egypt.

  Via University College London - Digital Egypt - Koptos

21:05
7095 c7e2 500

The main temple of Koptos was already heavily destroyed by the time Petrie started his excavations. Petrie could only record some important features of the Ptolemaic-Roman temple, which show that the building was at least at this time a double temple, dedicated to Min and Isis, who was at Koptos the wife of Min. From the temple of the New Kingdom Petrie could only trace the outlines, while from the earlier temples only single blocks and elements were found. However, there is a series of reliefs belonging to king Nubkheperre Intef (17th Dynasty), and there are important objects (colossi statues, figures of lions) of the pre-and early dynastic period, showing the importance of the temple at that time. Reconstructions on Digital Egypt focus on these periods. All these reconstructions are highly hypothetical, but based on contemporary parallels from other sites in Egypt.

  Via University College London - Digital Egypt - Koptos

June 14 2013

08:20
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Hierakonpolis: the Shrine of the South

Not until the Early Dynastic Period, however, do we gain a fairly clear picture of what these earliest temples may have looked like. The first example of a cult temple of this period known to us is that of Nekhen or Hierakonpolis – ‘city of the falcon’ as the Greek called it – in southern Egypt (Kom El Ahmar). Recent excavations in this area indicate that by 3500 BCE Hierakonpolis was perhaps the most important settlement in the Nile valley and may have acted as a kind of national shrine for Upper Egypt in this early period.

Archaeological evidence uncovered since 1985 shows that the earliest temple complex at the site consisted of a large, parabolic-shaped court over 32 m (105 ft) long and some 13 m (43 ft) wide. The court was bounded by a mud-covered reed fence and contained a large mound of sand and, near the court’s apex, a tall pole which, judging by later representational evidence bore a flag or totem, possibly an image of the falcon form deity of Hierakonpolis. On the north side of the court were a gateway and a number of small rectangular buildings – evidently workshops associated with the cult – while on the court’s south side stood the shrine itself.

From the evidence of the excavated post holes and trenches, combined with early representations of the shrine of surviving seal impressions, we know that it was a rectangular structure fronted by huge wooden pillars 1-1.5 m (3 ft 3 in-4 ft 11 in) in diameter and as much as 12 m (39 ft 4 in) high. The curved roof rose to the front of the structure, giving it a form sometimes said to resemble of a crouching animal but also not unlike the shape of the archaic fetish represented as a bandage-wrapped bird of prey and later used as a determinative in writing the words akhem ‘divine image’ and Nekheny ‘(the god) of Nekhen [i.e., Hierakonpolis]. This latter similarity should be considered seriously because it appears that it was the falcon god assimilated with Horus, the patron god of kingship – as depicted on the Narmer Palette and other artifacts found at this site – which was worshipped here. In any event, the sloping roofline of the shrine may possibly be reflected in the gradually lowering levels – front to back – of the later Egyptian temple. …


  Via Ancient Egypt Temples | Egypt.net.in

Reposted bywtfpantera wtfpantera
07:33
07:06
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Images from a painted tomb (T100 at Nekhen/Hierakonpolis) illustrate the shift from live animals to painted ones to indicate a ruler’s power. (Drawing courtesy Renée Friedman)

  Via Uncovering the Origins of Ancient Egypt – News Watch

07:03
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Painting in tomb T100 (detail), Hierakonpolis (Nekhen). Fragment in the Cairo Egyptian Museum

07:00
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Painting in tomb T100, Hierakonpolis (Nekhen). Fragment in the Cairo Egyptian Museum

via wikimedja commons

June 01 2013

23:15
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art-of-swords:

Ceremonial Dagger from Gebel el-Arak

  • Dated: Naqada Period, circa 3300–3200 BCE
  • Culture: Egyptian, Gebel el-Arak, south of Abydos
  • Medium: silex (blade), hippopotamus ivory (handle)
  • Measurements: L. 25.50 cm

This unique dagger from the late predynastic period consists of a light silex blade, sculpted using a highly sophisticated technique, and an ivory handle featuring carved bas-relief scenes. It is one of the oldest known examples of bas-relief sculpture. The themes come from Nilotic as well as Mesopotamian traditions: animals, the hunt, lions overwhelmed by a figure, boats, and human combats.

  • A luxury object

Everything in this weapon illustrates luxury and technical expertise. The blade, made of extremely high-quality, light ocher slate, reflects an accomplished mastery of stone-cutting techniques. Parallel strips were removed on one side to form a regular pattern. The other side of the blade is simply polished. Small areas were reworked to form a sharp serrated edge.

Egyptian craftsmen used this meticulous technique for a short period only, between 3500 and 3200 BCE. This is the most accomplished example of the silex tool making technique. Analyses of the handle determined that it is made of a hippopotamus tooth. Only a small number of ivory dagger handles of this type, decorated with relief carving, exist. These were exceptional works, reserved to an elite.

  • Men and animals

The blade is set into a carved hippopotamus tooth and has a central knob with a hole for attaching a cord. On one side is a bearded figure wearing a cap, standing between and subduing two lions. Below are two domesticated dogs and wild animals; a hunter seems to be catching an antelope. The other side depicts combats arranged in several registers. At the top are quasi-nude men wearing penis sheaths, in hand-to-hand combat. At the bottom, dead bodies are strewn between two different types of boats, both in use in Egypt during the Naqada period.

  • A key work

Animal life, hunting, and boating on the Nile are ancient themes that had already appeared on ceramics and paintings during the Naqada Period. The bas-relief carving that appeared at this time on large contemporaneous palettes depicted more dynamic and less static scenes than images on earlier traditional ceramic pieces. Furthermore, the battle theme appeared toward the end of this period, which is why researchers have tried to find a narrative link to historical events. Today they are interpreted more as referential images, a catalogue of themes that were important to the ruling class during a period when the Egyptian state was taking shape. 

As is often the case, certain motifs are variations of those from the contemporaneous Mesopotamian culture, such as the bearded figure of the priest king and the “Master of Animals” figure subduing two beasts. Direct or indirect contacts certainly existed between the two civilizations. The design of superimposed registers and the conventions used to represent the human figure were used throughout the entire pharaonic period. This object illustrates the shift from the late predynastic period to the birth of the pharaonic civilization.

Source: © Musée du Louvre

Reposted byzEveRsiriusminerva

August 06 2012

02:40
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People, boats, and animals, detail of a watercolor copy of a wall painting from Tomb 100 at Hierakonpolis, Predynastic, ca. 3500-3200 B.C.E. Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian

March 25 2011

21:24
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Predynastic Egyptian artifacts

Reposted byAncientEgyptiansiriusminerva
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