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May 20 2014

04:53

May 15 2014

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July 15 2013

07:13
3101 b64c 500

The procession of Amun-Re’s divine bark [barque]. Relief from the Red Chapel of Hatshepsut.

… Sacred Barks and Divine Rest Stations

Central to these festivals were magnificent processions in which priests transported the golden, bejeweled cult statues of the gods within a type of portable shrine. Taking the form of miniature boats called sacred barks, these model vessels were covered in gold foil and encrusted with precious gemstone inlays of lapis lazuli, turquoise, and carnelian. Each deity had his or her own sacred bark which priests transported over land on platforms with several long carrying poles. Two impressive figureheads at the prow and stern of each bark identified its owner. Amun’s bark had ram’s head figureheads since that animal was sacred to him, that of Mut had a woman’s head fore and aft, each wearing the Double Crown, and Khonsu’s had falcon’s heads with lunar crescents and disks. …

via Hypostyle Project :: Meaning and Function :: University of Memphis

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian
07:03
3106 eb5d 500

Depiction of a wayside bark [barque] shrine built by Hatshepsut. Relief from her Red Chapel.

… Festival processions departed from the inner sanctum of Karnak and advanced along sacred avenues towards Luxor Temple or to waiting river barges that conveyed them further upriver to Luxor or across the Nile to the royal memorial temples on the West Bank of Thebes. Occasionally, the gods—not to mention the priests supporting them—needed to rest from the heat and dust of their tiring journeys. Many pharaohs, therefore, kindly provided them with convenient resting shrines along the way. Never missing a chance for self-promotion, the king would name the wayside shelters after himself and would remind the gods of his piety in temple inscriptions and representations describing them. For example, scenes on the “Red Chapel" of the female pharaoh Hatshepsut (ruled ca. 1473-1358 BCE) at Karnak depict several wayside shrines that she erected between the temple complexes of Karnak and Luxor. …


via Hypostyle Project :: Meaning and Function :: University of Memphis

Reposted byAncientEgyptian AncientEgyptian
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