Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

June 20 2013

20:47
1580 3575 500

J. Probst House
Hickory, NC 1883
Second Empire
I know little about this charming cottage beyond the fact that it is now a museum.

Reposted bypannakojot pannakojot
20:44
1581 174b 500

Heck House
Raleigh, NC 1875
Second Empire
Colonel Jonathan Heck made his fortune manufacturing bayonets during the Civil War (for the Union), then after the war moved to Raleigh and went into real estate. This homey yet still elegant Second Empire cottage was one of a trio that he built for sale. All three are still standing, and are still private residences.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

Reposted bypannakojot pannakojot
20:42
1586 502c 500

Smith House
Providence, RI 1883
Second Empire
This modest house, built by a bank employee with the unassuming name of John Smith, is perhaps more typical of the kind of Second Empire home that the middle class would have built, as opposed to the more elaborate Second Empire houses one typically sees photographed. The house is still a private residence.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

Reposted byjandry jandry
20:38
1587 2435 500

Meyers House
Bethlehem, PA 1874
Second Empire
George Meyers was the son-in-law of Francis Weiss, who owned the house next door (see house PA2). Like Weiss, Meyers also made his fortune in the coal business. This house is used today as an apartment building.

via Dave's Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

20:34
1588 391b 500

Weiss House
Bethlehem, PA 1870
Second Empire
Francis Weiss was a surveyor, engineer, and businessman who made his fortune in coal mining and railroad construction. Built long and narrow, this house is so large that it now holds five condominium apartments. The Meyers House is next door to this one.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

20:28
1590 8aaa 500

Packer Mansion
Jim Thorpe, PA 1874-81
Second Empire
Asa Packer arrived in the town of Jim Thorpe (then called Mauch Chunk) just as the transition from canals to railroads was taking place. He became wealthy in the railroad business and built this fine house for his son Harry as a wedding present. The original house was wholly Second Empire in style, but in 1881 Harry added the massive grey limestone porch and the slender square tower at the left. Today the house is a bed and breakfast inn.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

20:24
1591 9a3b 500

Evans House
Salem, VA 1882
Second Empire
John Evans was a prosperous dry goods merchant in the Salem-Roanoke area. This rather small house looks bigger than it is due to the monumental elegance of its design and the natural haughtiness of the Second Empire style. It is still a private residence.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

20:20
1592 9705 500

Gingerbread House
Savannah, GA 1899
Carpenter Gothic
This house was built by German emigrant Cord Asendorf, a successful grocer and realtor, as his retirement house. Originally a country house located beyond the city limits, it is now practically downtown. It is still used as a private residence.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

Reposted bymolotovcupcake molotovcupcake
20:00
1593 b7e7 500

Brooks House
Salem, MA 1851
Gothic Revival
This house was built by one Timothy Brooks, but he died soon after its construction and it was his son Henry who lived there over 40 years, until his death in 1898. The house is still privately owned.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

19:57
1595 b775 500

Roseland
Woodstock, CT 1846
Gothic Revival
Roseland was built by Henry Bowen, a native of Woodstock who made his fortune in New York City as a newspaper publisher and silk merchant. Bowen named the house Roseland for the gardens that surrounded it. The house is unusually large for a Gothic Revival cottage, with a floorplan resembling that of a railroad train. The house is a museum today.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

Reposted bymolotovcupcakepetitpapillon
19:54
1596 41d3 500

Bulkeley House
Southport, CT 1861-86
Gothic/Late Victorian
The main part of this house was built in 1861 by Moses Bulkeley, a prosperous merchant. The house at first was purely Gothic Revival, but Bulkeley’s son Oliver added the massive square tower to the house in 1886 and made some other late-Victorian renovations. The house is still a private residence.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

19:50
1599 aa43 500

The Gothic Cottage
Cazenovia, NY 1847
Gothic Revival
This house was built by local merchant Jacob Ten Eyck. When it was put up for sale in 1965, there were fears that it would soon become a parking lot. A determined effort by local preservationists resulted in the cottage being purchased by the town and completely renovated. It is now used for town offices.

19:48
1601 4478 500

Lyndhurst
Tarrytown, NY 1838-65
Gothic Revival
Lyndhurst is generally considered to be the most perfect example of a Gothic Revival mansion in America. Construction began in 1838, but the house was nearly doubled in size by additions made in the early 1860’s. The house is also famous (or infamous) for once being the home of the notorious Gilded-Era robber baron, Jay Gould. The house is a museum today.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

19:45
1605 df2d 500

Kingscote
Newport, RI 1841-80
Gothic/Shingle Style
Kingscote was built for George Noble Jones, a wealthy resident of Savannah, GA, who used it as a summer home to escape the Savannah heat. It is an important house architecturally, because it is one of the oldest surviving U.S. houses built in a Victorian style rather than a formal style (Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival). Only the right-most three-quarters of the house are original. The Shingle-Style tower on the left with its more severe facade was added in the 1880’s. The house is now a museum.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

19:31
1610 fdf7 500

The Abbey
Cape May, NJ 1870
Gothic Revival
One of the most heavily photographed houses in America, the Abbey was built by John McCreary, a Pennsylvania coal baron, as a summer home. The house is mostly Gothic Revival in character, but the huge Italianate-style tower with its massive Second-Empire-style roof makes it a unique Victorian classic. The house today is a bed and breakfast inn.

via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

June 06 2013

23:24
1197 1a24 500

Alexander J. Downing
A House Without Feeling (L) and A House With Feeling
ca. 1850

21:45
1220 6b3f 500

Alexander J. Davis
Knoll
1840
Tarrytown, NY

21:25
1251 fc66 500

Rotch House New Bedford, MA 1846
Gothic Revival

This house was built by William Rotch, heir of a prominent New Bedford whaling family. More notably, however, the house was designed by the dean of American Gothic Revival architects, Alexander Jackson Davis, and it is considered to be one of the finest surviving examples of his work. The house is still a private residence.

  Via Dave’s Victorian House Site - East Coast Victorians

21:15
1262 744f 500

A.J. Davis, Architect
Rotch House
1845
New Bedford, MA

21:05
1273 300a 500

The Rotch House - 1846 - New Bedford, MA
Gothic Revival

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl